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Good Enough to Eat

Traditionally wedding flowers were a unique combination of blooms put together to convey the hopes and dreams for the soon to be married couple’s future.  A red chrysanthemum to say ‘I love you’, orange blossom to show purity, innocence and chastity, an arum lily would convey patience.

Then, wedding bouquets favoured classic blooms, such as the rose, lilies, lisanthus or stephanotis in pure and simple whites. They were often elaborate designs, long and trailing, using delicate feminine blooms.

Fast forward to today and just about anything goes. You can create a theme in pretty much anyway you choose.

Beach wedding? Short wedding dress ✔️  Sandals/thongs/barefoot  ✔️ Macrame backdrop ✔️  Gorgeous fresh tropical blooms.

Winter wedding? Fur bolero ✔️ Moody lighting ✔️ Rich colour tones ✔️ Lots of textured fresh flowers and foliage ✔️ Woodland setting ✔️

Vintage theme? Lace wedding gown ✔️ Muted, antique colour palette ✔️  Gathered bouquet of garden fresh flowers ✔️

But what about if you want to have something truly different? Like wedding bouquets that contain NO FRESH FLOWERS at all!!?? Now, I’m not talking about artificial wedding flower bouquets. I’m talking about doughnut bouquets. Yep. You heard right.

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Image;BBC via Paige Burgess

Seriously though, this week 23 year old Bride Paige Burgess from Sydney, surprised her 3 bridesmaids with bouquets of doughnuts created by Sydney-based company, Dessert Boxes.  It was certainly a diversion from tradition, and apparently a real talking point at the wedding, but what I find most amazing about this story after going to such an effort to do something so unique…..THE DONUTS WERE LEFT UNEATEN 😭

After getting through the ceremony and reception, with all the gorgeous treats on offer to eat, Burgess told the BBC: “We had plenty of goodies beforehand so we were too full too eat them.”

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Image; BBC via Paige Burgess
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Image; SBS via Dessert Boxes
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Image; SBS via Dessert Boxes

 

Weddings are entirely individual, and many ‘traditions’ that were once seen as essential to a beautiful wedding, are now quite easily substituted to better suit the pair who are aiming to create a memorable day. “We wanted the wedding to be a bit different and really reflect who we are as a couple,” Paige Burgess said of choosing her doughnut bouquets.  Her groom Steve even wore doughnut cuff-links! Dessert Boxes owner,  Samantha Khater says that it was all started as a social media based competition, where Paige was one of thousands of comments. Khater rang a few of the entrants before speaking with Paige and knowing she was the right girl for them. People’s response to the doughnut bouquets has been HUGE with brides-to-be inquiring about the doughnut bouquets which are currently not part of Dessert Boxes standard range.

It is not the first time that we have seen couples play around with traditional wedding details to suit their personalities and tastes. Over the years, many have shunned the traditional wedding (fruit) cake in favour of other popular cake choices. Or the cake has been omitted altogether in favour of a what has been dubbed a “Cheese- Cake”; not the New York baked variety, but instead a tiered display of delicious gourmet cheeses, adorned with fresh and dried fruits. And for several years now we have been able to send chocolate bouquets as gifts.

As a flower lover, I saw fresh flowers as an essential ingredient in my wedding day, but I know that everyone is different, and details I see as important may be insignificant to you. Would you consider edible bouquets for your wedding day?

Fwf x

 

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Victorian Posies- The Method and the Meaning

The Victorian posy is a traditional hand-tied or wired bunch where the flowers are placed in ascending rings around a central bloom, usually a rose. This design was very popular for weddings back in the mid 19th century, but lost favour to the cascading shower bouquet in the late 20th century.

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Image: Top Left, Top Right, Bottom Left, Bottom Right

Like all things in fashion, trends come and go, and the Victorian posy can sometimes be requested from time to time, especially for those who like to run their own race, uninterested by what is popular or on trend at the time.

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Image: Patsy Smiles

The Victorians did not have the variety of material available to them as we do today, so their posies tended to use an assortment of pale pink, lilac and blue toned flowers, in what we would consider to be quite traditional flowers such as roses, hyacinths, and cornflowers. The stunning central rose, I am told is pretty much integral to the design, but these days you could choose to make a Victorian posy out of just about any flowers or foliage you can get your hands on.

The Victorians used to back their posies with starched lace, which then became coloured netting or raffia, or twisted wire frames with foliage or even doilies, but theses days many of these elements have been replaced, or modernised.

This style of posy contained secret messages to and from lovers; each flower had its own unique meaning, and the bride chose her flowers based on their significance. As a result of this, unfortunately many beautiful flowers were assigned rather undeserved, sometimes negative meanings, for example, lavender=distrust, or anemones= sickness.

These days, brides tend to choose their flowers based on their preferences or flowers with special significance to them personally rather than these somewhat outdated meanings.

Gorgeous bridal bouquet design for the fall bride.:
Image: The Knot, Flowers by Festive Couture Floral
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Image: Cut Out and Keep

The Victorian style of posy fell out of favour during the early 20th century, but the posy has slowly gained popularity again, whether it be hand-tied and natural stemmed, or wired. A natural stemmed posy, as the name suggests, uses flowers on their stem, simply cleaned off so that the handle of the bouquet does not become contaminated from breaking down debris, or too bulky. This style of bouquet can be formal or informal, structured or unstructured depending on what flowers are chosen and its composition. Generally though, this look is more natural and relaxed.

Alternatively a wired bouquet can be created; which is where the flower is cut from it’s natural stem and then attached to an artificial stem made from wire. The result is usually more lightweight and as it is more structured, tends to look more formal.

The formality of the Victorian rings has been dropped, in favour of either evenly dispersed placements, where the flowers are evenly placed throughout the arrangement to achieve balance, or alternatively the floral elements can be grouped together for a ‘chunkier’, clustered and modern look.

At the end of the day, if you are considering a Victorian posy, or posy of any kind for your wedding, talk to you designer about the colours, textures and the overall look and feel you wish to achieve. Wedding professionals have a wealth of knowledge and will be able to make appropriate suggestions to help you achieve what you are after.

I cannot stress enough the importance of aligning yourself with suppliers who have a body of work that emulates the look and feel you are after.  Trusting your supplier is the single most important thing you can do to lower your individual stress as well as allowing them the freedom to ‘create’ and do exactly what you employed them to do…

Fwf x

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The Ultimate Compilation

Floristry is not something that comes naturally to everyone, as is often the case with many creative professions.  And sure, I guess there are elements of floristry that you do see everyday people giving a go, much like we might try and put a home colour through our hair. I’m sure that they are under no illusion that it looks ok, but certainly not professional, but sometimes this is all that is required, and we are all guilty of cutting corners (and costs) at times.

But there are some areas of floristry that should be left to the professionals. They are tedious and technically challenging and unforgiving, showing every fault when they are not created correctly.

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Image: Svenska Blomster Bloggar

The compilation bouquet is certainly one of these.

What is a compilation bouquet? The compilation bouquet, is also known as a composite bouquet, a Duchesse Rose (if made with roses), Malmaison or even a Glamellia.

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Image: Best Destination Wedding

Essentially it is a bouquet where individual blooms (of the one variety) are disassembled, and then the petals are wired and placed together again piece by piece until a giant single super bloom is created. These days many people bypass the wiring somewhat and glue the composition together. Regardless of what technique you favour, it is fiddly, detail orientated work and you should certainly ensure that you set up your work station with everything ready to go. If you are using the glue, it can get messy, and the individual rose petals can wither quickly.

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Image: Save On Crafts

The original term, “Glamellia” started back in the 1940-50’s, when during the war, Camellia blooms were considered particularly expensive. The solution? Take the petals of the more common, and less costly Gladioli, and create a single bloom that looks like the more expensive flower, the Camellia.  Glamellia= Gladioli + Camellia.

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Image: Wedding Bee

The term “composite” simply refers to any handmade flower which is accomplished by placing pieces of several flowers together to make it appear to be one large bloom.

Initially, this bouquet was designed with Gladioli, but most commonly it is created with roses. These days, the sky is the limit, and I have found some beautiful examples using Cymbidium Orchids, Ranunculas, Roselilies, Lilies and I’m sure there is much, much more out there.

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Image: Wedding Wire
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Image: Svetlana Lunin
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Image: Brad Austin
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Image: Wedd Book
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Image: Hot House Design Studio

The composite bouquet is an ‘Old School’ Floristry technique, and many florists would shy away from creating this style of bouquet simply because they are not ordered often, so you tend to feel out of practice. Undoubtedly this style of bouquet is a show stopper, primarily because it is not the kind of thing you see everyday.

One of the benefits of this style of bouquet is that it is lightweight and fairly easy to handle. As all the stems have been removed it tends to be far less bulky than any hand-tied or wired bouquet. It makes a fantastic choice for wedding bouquets, especially if you want to stand apart from what is out there generally.

What do you think, are you a fan of the “Glamellia”?

Til next time,

Fwf x

Featured Image: Inside Weddings

 

 

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WEDDINGS: Meet Kathryn and Michael

Florist with Flowers loves flowers. And more than that, we love working with you to create the flowers YOU want.

Getting engaged is such a special time, and there are so many things to consider when planning your wedding day. One thing you needn’t worry about is your flowers as our floral designers will professionally guide you though your options and help make your day look just as you had dreamed.

Every bride, every couple and every wedding is unique and is it especially important to choose a supplier you feel has the experience and attention to detail to achieve that for you. A wedding day gets no re-runs, so there are no second chances with your flowers. Unlike the venue, which you inspect and the dress that you try on,or the make up you have had trialed, you just don’t get the same opportunity with flowers. Sure we can, or any florist can give you a trial bouquet, but remember that we have no control over nature, and with a industry that is weather dependent, that is something you need to be on board with.

You need to trust your suppliers to make the best decision when the worst comes to worse. And without trying to be dramatic…..the worse can and does happen. Torrential rain causes damage rendering blooms unusable, a hot spell burns petals, and believe it or not, the temperature also can change the colour of blooms. White David Austins can be sun kissed with a blush of pink- sure, they are stunningly beautiful, but, if you are after pure white, it probably isn’t going to fit the brief. Is it? An experienced florist will be able to prepare you for the reality of fresh flowers at whatever time of year you plan to get hitched, and give you real options to achieve the look and feel that you are after.

We’d like to introduce you to a couple of special clients we have worked with:

The Couple: Kathryn and Michael

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How they met: Introduced by friends at an 18th birthday party

Wedding Date: 10th November

The wedding date was chosen purely for the flowers that were available at that time of the year. Kathryn had her heart set of hydrangeas and Peonies so the wedding had to work around them! Peonies only have a very short season (somewhere between 4-12 weeks depending on the weather/temperature) which usually takes place somewhere between Mid October and Late December.

Kathryn’s beautiful bouquet was made with a neutral colour palette, featuring hydrangea, lisianthus and peonies.

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Kathryn chose a rich regal purple for her bridesmaids gowns, and used a soft pastel blend of lisianthus, roses, hydrangea and silver suede (dusty miller) foliage.

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The Ceremony: Garrison Church, The Rocks, Sydney. The iconic church, with its long aisle was decorated with simple pew ends and large floral displays at either side of the alter.

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The Reception: The Sunset Room, Luna Park, Milsons Point, was adorned with tall candelabra arrangements, with the bridal table anchored with two large pedestal arrangements and a continuous floral hedge from end to end.

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Best Part of the day: “There are too many to just choose one however….having our reception at Luna Park we were able to go on all the rides with our bridal party and have photos which was so much fun!

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Best piece of advice for newly engaged couples: “Start early!!! The more you can organise early on, the better!”

Can we help you with an upcoming wedding? Florist with Flowers dedicated wedding consultant is happy to provide you with a one on one meeting to discuss your requirements and brainstorm together.

We recommend that you have both your dress and any dresses for your bridesmaids purchased before this takes place. Generally this meeting would take place no further in advance than 6 months prior to your wedding, in order to make the meeting as productive as possible in terms of making firm decisions.

Are you ready to come in? We can’t wait to hear your ideas, and start working to make your dreams come true!

Fwf x

Photographs taken by the talented  Ben Adams. Check him and his work out at www.blog.benadams.com.au/

 

 

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