Royal purple

Colour in Your Life – Royal Purple

Some colours command attention, and purple is a colour that certainly does that. Originally, purple was an incredibly costly colour to produce which contributed to it’s exclusivity. The reason for this was that the mucous from 9000 Mediterranean sea snails was required to make just a small quantity of natural Tyrian Purple dye.

Queen Elizabeth I, implemented and enforced Sumptuary Laws; laws which regulated the colours, fabrics and clothes that society was either able or unable to wear based on their class. During her reign, the colour we now know as ‘Royal Purple’ was reserved for the royal family. Queen Elizabeth I forbad anyone outside close members of the royal family to wear it.

Then, some 150 years ago, purple began weaving it’s way into society’s lower classes when an 18 year old chemist accidently created a synthetic purple dye whilst attempting to make Quinine, an anti-malaria drug. Whoops! Whilst he was not successful in making Quinine, he became incredibly well known and successful after his fortunate discovery. When he noticed that what he had concocted in his home lab could be used to dye fabrics, he quickly patented the dye and produced it under the name aniline purple.

Purple is a colour that looks great with various shades of itself. Monocramatic colour schemes work well as they play with differing shades of one colour.

Monocramatic

An analogous colour scheme uses a collection of colours that sit side by side on the colour wheel. These tend to work well together and look harmonious.

Analogous

For whatever reason, purple seems to be a colour people like to use with highly contrasting colours like orange, or bright yellow. While they certainly make an impact, these bright colour schemes do not suit everyone.

Contrasting colours

Contrasting colours

One of my favourite colour schemes using purple is when it is combined with shades of green. It works particularly well when you also use mauve along with the royal purple.

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The colour purple combines the energetic strength of red and the stability of blue. It symbolises nobility, dignity, royalty, prestige, luxury and ambition. It conveys both wealth and extravagance. It is also associated with creativity, mystery and magic. It is a colour that resonates with creative souls and humanitarians, it promotes mental balance and harmony of the mind, encourages sensitivity and compassion. But beware, too much purple is believed to exacerbate depression in those vulnerable to it. It is a colour that should be used in the home sparingly.

If you feel like Purple is the colour for you, you certainly have some  beautiful options. Just remember that the season will affect what is available to you for your event.

Royal Navy (purple) sweet pea
Sweet Pea. Source: Eden Brothers
Lilac
Lovely Lilac blooms 😍 Source: pinimg
Bearded iris
Bearded Iris. Source: Comanche Acres Iris
Purple Liatris
Purple Liatris. Source: Gardenerdy
Purple tulips
Deep purple tulips. Source: Jbirdny
Purple Lilac blooms
Purple Vanda Orchids
Purple Lisianthus
Purple Lisianthus. Source: Danisa Flowers
Various purple hyacinths
Various purple toned hyacinths. Source: Garden Design
Pretty purple carnations
Gorgeous purple carnations. Source: Pro Flowers
Butterfly buddleja
Butterfly Buddleja. Source: Not Cutts
Purple and mauve roses
Purple and mauve roses. Source: Gold Florist
Summery hydrangea
Summery hydrangea. Sourced via Pinterest
Deep purple delphinium
Delphinium. Source: Walters Garden

Another gorgeous colour to kick off your inspiration. Enjoy!

Fwf x

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