Would you consider artificial wedding flowers?

Is That Faux Real???

It’s Spring, so for the floral world that means that there is an abundance of gorgeous fresh flowers. Spring also marks the start of wedding season; and whilst you can get married at any time of year, the busiest time for nuptials generally spans from September through til March.

Especially popular wedding blooms such as garden roses, David Austin roses, Peonies, Lily of the Valley, Lilac and Hydrangea can be temperamental blooms, and as they are often grown outdoors, and influenced by the weather,  sometimes a contingency plan is best to discuss long before the wedding day to make sure everyone is on the same page.

That contingency plan will differ between clients, what flowers that have chosen, and what their expectations are. For some, a simple tweak is all that will be required. For example, let’s say you had a pale blush pink and white wedding bouquet ordered, made up from a combination of white Peonies and pale pink David Austin roses, with mid pink lisianthus and white lilac. As the wedding day approaches, the growers communicate that they are unable to supply white Peonies or pink David Austins Due to various issues. Provided that the bouquet can still be made in the colour blend discussed, and in the right combination to give you the ideal colour weighting, swapping a white peony for a pale pink one, and a pink rose for a white rose, may be a relatively easy fix.

Sometimes however, quite a different approach may be required…So today, my question is: If you had your heart set on a particular combination of blooms for your wedding bouquet, would you consider using some artificial or ‘silk’ blooms to achieve the look?

Fresh hydrangea arrangement
Fresh hydrangea arrangement. Source: Veranda
Artificial hydrangea arrangement
Artificial hydrangea arrangement. Source: Lavender Hills Interiors

Some years ago….in maybe 2008, shock jock Kyle Sandilands married aspiring pop star Tamara Jaber in an extravagant affair. From memory, her bouquets contained clusters of artificial Hydrangea, intricately woven between the other featured fresh blooms. Hydrangea is one of those flowers that is extremely popular, but can be extremely delicate in our Australian weather. In a hot and dry environment, it is quite possible to dry hydrangea, and for it retain most of its colour. The problem is often our weather is humid, and therefore the hydrangea can not dry, but rather wilts leaving the blooms shrivelled, soft and unrecognisable. Hydrangea requires a lot of water and therefore can be a tricky bloom to work with particularly in summer.

Artificial peonies in a vase
Artificial peonies in a vase. Source Wilmington NC Beer Week
Fresh peonies in a vase
Fresh peonies in a vase. Source:

Another bloom which is extremely popular for weddings is the gorgeous peony. Peonies usually have a local season of about 6 -8 weeks. Peony lovers will know that the bloom starts out as a round ball, pretty much unrecognisable as a peony. Slowly the petals unravel revealing a fluffy, ruffle of frilly petals. As you can appreciate, florists buy fresh flowers in advance for weddings so that they are at the ideal stage of development for the wedding. But, if they are not ready to be cut when you need them, there is little sense cutting a bunch of blooms, which when cut prematurely, will never open. Would you consider the silk equivalent?

Fresh frangipani blooms
Fresh Frangipanis. Source; Homes to Love
Artificial frangipani
Artificial frangipani. Source: Amazon

Or what about Frangipanis? I suppose you think it would be easy enough just to pick them from some random tree and whip up a bouquet with a luscious summery scent. Frangipanis have to be picked very early in the morning before the sun has really warmed them up or you risk them all browning and wilting. Frangipani blooms are short and closely clustered together. To use them, each flower must be carefully removed and individually wired to create an artificial stem. When flowers are used in this way, they are removed from their water source, and therefore this must be done as close as possible to the time when the bouquets will be used. For this reason, some florists will decline taking on work that requires fresh Frangipanis, or will suggest using artificial or latex versions of the bloom. The clear downside in this case is that artificial blooms will not have the sedeuctive fragrance that Frangipanis are so famous for.

For me, an artificial substitute just will not do if I have to forgo what I love most about a bloom, like it’s fragrance. BUT, I do think that sometimes small quantities of artificial flowers carefully used in combination with some fresh blooms can be a great back up plan when needed….how about you?

Fwf x

 

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All Hail The Queen of Flowers

Being a mum of two young girls, hairstyling is something I have had to get good at, quick 💇🏼 But, I’ve come to the realisation this week, that I am still reinventing the same tired old hairstyles that I grew up with, and really I have to lift my game. It used to be enough to add a couple of cute clips, or a ribbon. Hell, a hair circlet was reserved for a christening, or confirmation, or wedding….some sort of special occasion. These days, flower crowns are becoming almost commonplace, and it appears that a head literally FULL of flowers is what is hot right now.

What has inspired the new look? Queen Bey, of course.

Queen Bey in her full floral headdress

Beyoncé’s September Vogue cover pictured her wearing a full floral headpiece that was as high as it was wide. Created by inspired London based floral designer, Rebel Rebel, the over the top head piece looked as though she had literally gathered the entire field of flowers on top of her head. Another headpiece created for the shoot was filled with an enormous amount of luscious green leaves, textured elements and lush tropical blooms.

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Photo by Tyler Mitchell, Vogue, Sept 2018
Beyoncé floral headpiece
Photo by Tyler Mitchell, Vogue, Sept 2018

The UK version of the magazine featured Rhianna on the cover also adorned with a full floral piece. So, given that the September issue is the most important issue of the year for the fashion magazine, it appears that flowers are going to be HUGE for the year ahead.

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As is often the case with Beyoncé, this trend has kicked into overdrive. Taylor R (@iamtay_tay) says she was inspired by Beyoncé’s floral head fashion, and so set about creating her own user friendly version that she has shared with the world via You Tube. Her unique ‘up style’ reduces the weight and heat of a full floral piece making the trend more accessible for ordinary people to incorporate everyday 😂

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The floral industry has seen designs like the living card come and go, so why not a living vase? While as a creative I appreciate someone thinking outside the box, I have to be honest and say I am just not convinced that this flower vase hair is going to take off.

Still, we are totally willing and able to create. gorgeous arrangement for you should you wish to experiment with this new look for your next party, exhibition…or just a day at the office 😉 Because, after all you should never let someone else’s opinion become your reality….you only get one life to live, have fun with it!

Fwf x

 

 

 

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Floral Beards, Wigs and Wonder

Agricultural shows like Sydney’s Royal Easter Show, as well as regional shows, like Brisbane’s EKKA have always included some sort of floral design competition. In addition to prize winning specimens of stunning camellias, roses, and of course the local gigantic pumpkin, a variety of arrangements are submitted, displayed and judged on a a list of criteria.

This years EKKA took the concept of ‘manscaping’ to a whole new level. Instead of removing excess hair, the challenge at yesterday’s EKKA instead was to decorate the beard and head area of a (brave and) a willing participant using a combination of flowers and trees native to Queensland. In addition to exploring creativity, the event was able to shine the light brightly on the gorgeous native flora from the region, which can often be overlooked for imported varieties.

Floral beards
Source : Channel 7 News
Floral beards
Channel 7 News
Floral beards
Source: Channel 7 News
Floral beards
Source: Channel 7 News
Floral beards
Source: Channel 7 News

The trend has featured at EKKA over the last couple of years and provides an interesting medium to work with. Florists are accustomed to working on intricate floral crowns, floral fascinators, head bands, corsages, neckpieces, buttonholes, even pieces to attach to your clutch bag.

Competitions often provide an opportunity to experiment in ways that we don’t get in our usual business dealings. Over the years I have seen challenges like this where you get to dress a mannequin in flowers, or create wonderful scenes entirely from flowers. It is an incredible to experience to ‘see’ your materials in an entirely new light. I’m reminded of this often when playing with my children. Like when you’re lying on the grass looking at the clouds and seeing shapes and scenes, similarly, my middle child will pick up a coloured leaf on a walk that may have an unusual shape and will see a way she can use it in a piece of art.

I do not anticipate that floral beards are the next big thing. However for the hipster crowd it may provide an interesting and certainly unique way for men to incorporate more florals in their outfits for a special occasion. Just as men began wearing engagement rings a few years ago, we may see some orders for a floral beard adornment for a wedding. Why do the girls get to have all the fun? 😉 Floral expression is something entirely personal and so that means that our designs are guided by what our customer wants.

In the meantime, it gets our creative juices flowing simply thinking about the possibilities. And sometimes, the act of just thinking differently can be the key….

Fwf x

 

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Inspired by Nature

Many of you are probably familiar with Cicely Mary Barker’s 1920’s collection of books; a unique series that combined the illustration of delicate creatures, holding flowers available throughout the different seasons of the year. Her ‘Flower Fairy’ books have since been republished many times, using modern techniques to lovingly reproduce Barker’s original artworks.

Barker lacked formal artistic training, however she was happiest with a sketch pad in her hand. Her passionate dedication led to her first publication at the tender age of 15, with a series of postcards. Cicely Mary Barker was largely educated at home due to ill health, and was a self taught artist with obvious natural ability. The Flower Fairies, first published in 1923, brought her international acclaim as an artist.

Each fairy was designed holding a bloom, illustrated with meticulous botanical accuracy, and dressed in a costume that quite often looked like the flower had been carefully dissected and placed, petal by petal in place of clothes. The series has continued to capture both children and adults alike, and has certainly earned its place amongst classic literature.

Her summer edition includes many of this season’s treats, such as the glorious summer garden rose, scabiosa, forget-me-nots and more. I love her winged creatures, with their dainty features, the delicate belled sleeves, and full, blossomed skirts.

While it is not quite the same, many designers recently have used flower petals to create fashion pieces, and I can’t help but wonder if Barker may have provided some inspiration. Grace Ciao, a Singaporean artist, along with Lim Zhi Wei have deconstructed flowers and placed the petals back piece by piece to create frilly skirts and full, flouncy dresses. We’ve included a selection of examples by each, and will let you make up your own mind. What is evident however is that nature provides us with boundless inspiration, if only we take the time to see it.

Fwf x

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* THE SONG OF *

THE FORGET-ME-NOT FAIRY

So small, so blue, in grassy places

My flowers raise

Their tiny faces.

By streams my bigger sisters grow,

And smile in gardens,

In a row.

I’ve never seen a garden plot;

But though I’m small,

Forget me not!

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* THE SONG OF *

THE SCABIOUS FAIRY

Like frilly cushions full of pins

for tiny dames and fairykins;

Or else like dancers decked with gems,

My flowers sway on slender stems.

They curtesy in the meadow grass,

And nod to butterflies who pass.

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* THE SONG OF *

THE ROSE FAIRY

Best and dearest flower that grows,

Perfect both to see and smell;

Words can never, never tell

Half the beauty of a Rose –

Buds that open to disclose

Fold on fold of purest white,

Lovely pink, or red that glows

Deep, sweet-scented. What delight

To be Fairy of the Rose!

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* THE SONG OF *

THE FUCHSIA FAIRY

Fuchsia is a dancer

Dancing on her toes,

Clad in red and purple,

By a cottage wall;

Sometimes in a greenhouse,

In a frilly white and rose,

Drssed in her best for the fairies’ evening ball!

Grace Ciao design
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Grace Ciao design
Arum lilies used to create elegant skirts
Lim Zhi Wei design
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Lim Zhi Wei design
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Lim Zhi Wei design

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Taste of Summer – Pineapples

In winter, I like things cosy; warm lighting, textured fabrics, and throws, rich colour tones. Autumn calls for warm, rustic tones and layering, and Spring with it’s new growth sprouting, beckons for fresh, light colour tones, light layers and bright open spaces.

For me, Summer has a different feeling….or flavour if you like. Australian summers can be anything from hot and dry, to wet and sticky….but regardless, the longer days call us outside and give us a special kind of motivation.

Summer fruit bowls are full of colour and offer so much vareiety; lychees, melons, grapes, mangoes and pineapples….just to name a few.

Did you know that the pineapple is part of the bromeliaceae family? In fact, the pineapple is the only bromeliad that is a commercially important food. Most other bromeliads are popular as ornamental plants, whether grown in a garden or kept as a indoor house plant. The popular tropical fruit is the single most economically significant bromeliad. Pineapples can be enjoyed raw, cooked or juiced, and ornamental pineapples are just as versatile.

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Image; Bakker

If the latest news is anything to go by, this year has been a bumper year for pineapple production, so much so, that hundreds of tonnes of the fruit were left to rot in North Queensland. Like all fresh grown produce, timing your crop is especially important. This year however, due to higher temperatures and early rain, the glut in supply coincided with the Golden Circle cannery’s annual holiday closure period. Ouch…They warn that this will affect the availability of Australian canned pineapple in the months to come.

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Image: Bakker

For florists, Pineapples provide an interesting textured focal. Ornamental pineapples can create an exotic, and glamorous display paired with other tropical blooms or simple foliage. They can be the traditional green and gold varieties, and also come with a beautiful pink blush to them with rich burgundy foliage. This makes the creative possibilities almost endless!!! Fruit has been used within flower arrangements for an eternity, that is nothing new, but the way we use materials these days differs. If you are aiming to create tropical themed nuptials, the humble pineapple could certainly provide a dramatic answer, check out some of the inspiration below!

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Via Pinterest

I love the way the pineapples have been used in the tablescape above.  It is the kind of idea that can be easily adapted for use at home or parties, and the best thing about it is it can be enjoyed later too!

But, if fruit in your flower arrangements really isn’t your thing, you can always combine your pineapple with a touch of white rum, coconut milk, ice and a fancy paper umbrella for the true taste of summer! 🍹 🍍 🌴  It’d be a shame for any more of these glorious specimans to go to waste… 😂

Fwf x

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Bandit By Name, Brilliant By Nature

With the new year fast approaching, many are probably putting pen to paper jotting down the aspirations they have for the year ahead. I must admit I stopped writing New Year’s Resolutions a long time ago…

I believe in living life the way that you want to live it every day, and if you do that, you don’t really need to have New Year’s Resolutions”

– Tom Ford

I stumbled across a story of a guerilla floral designer in New York attempting to do just that; living and creating the life he wants each and every day….and spreading his joy in the process. Like many of us in the wedding and event industries- we spend countless hours bringing a vision to life, to create what appears to be the perfect day. Most of the time, sadly, many of the flowers are left or discarded. In some ways I guess they have already served their purpose, but this floral designer decided he could spread the joy much, much further.

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Image; Lewis Miller Design

Lewis Miller and his team, now takes armfuls of fresh cut flowers that are largely left over from events to decorate garbage cans around the city of New York. Yep, you read that right….garbage bins. Why? Miller, despite having a successful, thriving business, was feeling unfulfilled. The idea behind these street art installations was that Miller and his team could create something more authentic and organic in nature, to spread the feeling of joy, and make everlasting memories for everyday city dwellers.

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Image; Lewis Miller Designs

Lewis Miller, owner of Lewis Miller Designs says “Gifting flowers to New Yorkers is a simple idea that I have been thinking about for years.”

Miller, dubbed the ‘Flower Bandit’ by Vogue, began his “Flower Flashes” in October 2016, and initially intended it to be just a one off event to reinvigorate himself artistically and reconnect with his craft. It evolved into a beautiful shared experience for countless New Yorkers, creating a positive emotional response from the floral installations.

“Who doesn’t love to get flowers? They are such a luxury, and New York City is a very gritty, fast-paced town. If we can bring nature—something wild and sumptuous—to New Yorkers and make them smile, the way people smile when they witness a random act of kindness, then that is a great thing. That is my goal. It’s a really simple vision but powerful, I think, to try to create an emotional response through flowers.”

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Image; Lewis Miller Designs

In addition to the beautiful blooming bins filled with spectacular bouquets of flowers, Miller and his team have also  decorated statues, sculptures and other public works of art. By adding fresh flowers, these landmarks have been transformed into colourful and eye catching displays.

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Image; Lewis Miller Design

 

“My team and I work really fast and very early in the a.m. Our call time for these flashes is 5:45 a.m., and we try to finish them before sunrise. We always recycle flowers from events when possible.”

“I don’t see us stopping anytime soon. These flashes are so gratifying and rewarding on many levels.”

Florist with Flowers would like to wish you all a very happy New Year, go forth into 2018 with the courage and conviction to be the change in the world that you wish to see.

Fwf x

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Foraging for Home

To forage; is to search widely for, hunt or search for provisions.

It’s not a new idea by any means, but foraging is back in vogue.  Often the concept centres around collecting food supplies, but what I am referring to here is foraging for unique materials that can be utilised when arranging florals.

Wholesalers throughout the Sydney and Interstate markets provide us with a wonderful array of flowers and foliage, as do our local growers BUT sometimes there are reasons for us to look elsewhere. You may need several different texture elements in an arrangement and it simply doesn’t make financial sense to outlay the expense of buying a whole bunch of each. Plus you have to remember that growers provide what the market is asking for; DEMAND drives SUPPLY. Therefore, if something is simply not popular (as opposed to being ‘unpopular’),  fewer people (if any) will choose to grow it.

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Image; A little Terroir

The problem is that the stock variety on offer at the market declines based on what is profitable, and what is popular, and therefore it is hard to get your hands on quality produce that sits outside of the box! The result? You have to grow it yourself, or find someone, somewhere that does!

For the more bespoke arrangements, unique materials are required. It is the intricacies in that details that makes the design speak so loudly, so going that extra mile to find the perfect material certainly pays dividends. Like the gorgeous bouquet below from Botanica featuring so many different elements, sometimes just single stems, which creates so much interest and movement throughout the arrangement.

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Image; Bespoke bridal bouquet from Botanica

But the concept of foraging is something that you can incorporate at home too- by foraging just for foliage you can save yourself a lot. Tropical leaves are often sold per piece, which can quickly add up. Even bunches of green leaves like camellia, laurel, vibernum or magnolia can be quite costly to add to your vase of flowers, especialy if you have a tree in your backyard where you can get what you need for free.

 

Many plants will love having a good hard prune once a year, so chopping the tops off your Cordyline plants or Dracenas will do them the world of good. You will find that fresh foliage like this will last you several weeks if not months, so purchasing some fresh cut flowers weekly to make your display more colourful and eye-catching is still good value! It might even allow you a little extra $$$ to play with!

I am a massive fan of foraging for foliage. We regularly collect Philodendron and Monsteria leaves locally, and I’ve been enjoying whole heads of cordyline plants from our garden for weeks teamed with spiraling Corksia ginger foliage.

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Image; Foraged supplies from Hej Doll

It’s important to remember that not all plants are ideal for using as cut flowers or foliage. Some simply do not have a long vase life, or are not happy submerged in water. In addition to that, some plants are poisonous, so it is important that when you forage that you are not using the flowers on food items, and that you always wash your hands. Reactions can be mild rashes and itching, but can also be severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. If in doubt, cut only what you know is safe to use/touch and seek more information.

It’s a lovely winter activity for the family to go out and collect things together, and is a nice substitute for collecting shells along the beach in summer.

Fwf x

 

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Quick Stick Decorating

Winter is a time to spend a little more time cosied up on the couch, or near the fire, so it makes great sense that we create an internal space that makes our hearts and soul sing.  The cooler temperatures mean that we are less social spending more time in our own homes, so it is nice to spend some of our energy doing some simple decorating. It is easy to stick your tried and tested methods of decorating, adding an indoor plant or a vase of cut fresh flowers, but winter offers up some interesting and long lasting alternatives to your regular fresh cut flowers or indoor plants.

Disiduous branches and sticks are a fantastic way of filling a vase for weeks at a time. Depending on what you choose you may or may not need to add water to the vase- and for someone like me who hates cleaning dirty vases of stinky water, this spells H-E-A-V-E-N! Some sticks, such as magnolia branches or cherry blossom for example will flower and bloom and will require a vaseful of fresh water, but believe me, the floral display is certainly worth the effort! Other branches are sold more for their architectural qualities and are striking in a vase en masse. In this case, you can choose to display them in a vessel without water. Any sticks that are displayed this way will become more brittle with time but in general, their appearance changes very little. As the branches become more brittle, it is advisable that they are not moved often, as you will see the branches breaking and becoming damaged.

So what can you get your hands on in the coming months? Well, consider these;

Budded magnolia branches are divine! The naked branches are shapely and interesting alone, but for a matter of weeks you can enjoy the pretty blooms in soft cream, mauve and pink tones. When the blooms are spent, simply pinch them off the stem, and enjoy the naked branches.

 

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Image via Pinterest

Lichen covered sticks are super interesting to look at;they look a bit moody and mysterious. The leafless branches are covered in silvery green flakes that resemble peeling paint. The branches bring a certain woodland vibe,  and the natural beauty of the forest.

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Image: Etsy

Dogwood is stunning throughout winter, with its reddish, golden glow. It is so different to the other sticks available with its vibrant colour, and adds visual warmth to a room or an arrangement.

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Pussy willow have furry buds called catkins along the length of their stems. Before they come into full flower, they are covered in a fine, grey fur, which leads to the comparison to ‘pussies’ or small cats.

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Image: The Spruce

 

Tortured Willow is a unique tree that is also known as curly willow, twisted willow or corkscrew willows due to its wiggly stems. It is a plant native to Korea and North Eastern China that was introduced to Australia for ornamental purposes, but when left, it invades riverbanks and creeks. All species of willow are considered weeds due to their invasive nature, as they have aggressive root systems that cause damage to footpaths and drains.  However as a cut material, it looks beautiful in its simplicity. Tortured willow does not require water, however if left dry, it will also become brittle, and break easily. If it is placed in water, the tortured willow will remain malleable, easily manipulated into different shapes- making it ideal for creating sculptures and wreaths. It will also quickly develop roots in water, so can be planted again.

An abstract composition of a twisted willow tree
Image; Texas Tree Trimmers

 

Fruit tree Blossom are always popular, particularly cherry blossom, but there are many more fruit tree blossoms available such as peach blossom and apple blossom.

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Image; Apple Blossom by Pixabay

So, instead of sticking to what you know, give something different a go.

Fwf x

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Countdown to Chelsea

This morning I opened up my Facebook feed to find that an old travel companion had created an installation for this years Chelsea Flower Show. Is it really that time again….already? Jo was a uni student when we met many moons ago in Central America, but she has since forged a successful career in interior design and prop styling. The display she has created for the flower show features a Sunflower garden, made entirely of fabric and paper, held together no doubt with the assistance of every tradie lady’s favourite tool, the hot glue gun.

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Image; Jo Bailey

The Chelsea Flower show runs from Tuesday May 23rd til Saturday May 27th this year and promises to provide new ideas, fresh inspiration and as always wonderful, eye catching, stunningly beautiful garden displays. In addition to 28 gardens, and 100 plant displays, this year there is also a secret garden which is only visible from a viewing platform, BBC Radio 2 Feel Good Gardens with each garden focused on heightening one of the 5 senses, a fruit and vegetable garden with over 50 varieties of edible produce, urban murals and much, much more.

The Chelsea Flower Show is certainly on the bucket list for most florists, and for those who are lucky enough to get there this year, I’m sure it won’t disappoint. As this is the first show after Brexit, the show organisers were keen to rethink the show and it certainly has been reinvigorated, with lots of fresh content which has been key in the increased interest in the event. In the past the tickets have been slow to sell with tickets even available on the day. However this year, unbelievably, the popular show sold out more than 2 weeks before it opens, and now tickets are being offered online for £1300 a pair!

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Image; Telegraph

Also this year, Dame Judi Dench is being celebrated; having a gorgeous apricot toned rose named in her honour. The rose has a medium tea scent, and is a David Austin style rose.

Judi isn’t alone though, over the years many celebrities have had roses named in their honour. Barbara Streisand, an avid rose fan, has a deliciously fragrant lilac rose named after her. Freddie Mercury fans are said to have fund raised over 2000 pounds to breed a yellow rose in his honour 2 years after his death. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (William and Catherine) had a soft apricot rose that opens to white named in their honour at the show in 2011. And Julie Andrews had a rose named in her honour at the Chelsea Flower show back in 1992.

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Image; Barbara Streisand rose via Telegraph
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Image; William and Catherine Rose by David Austin

I can’t wait to see the photos emerging next week when the show opens, and I am keen to see how the public receives the new format and new features. As always, for the moment anyway I will admire the pictures from afar, but one day, maybe one day I will get there myself!

Stay tuned!

Fwf x

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Wedding Inspirations- Using Blue as your Primary Hue

As florists, the most challenging colour to work with is undoubtedly blue. Whilst blue is a primary colour, and what could be classed as a fairly conservative colour perhaps when thinking about Navy Blue, when it comes to flowers, it proves quite difficult. Despite this, varying shades of blue remain popular. One major factor that I believe contributes to blues popularity is the fact that in one of its varying shades, it seems to be able to complement most complexions. Aside from that, blue is a fairly conservative colour and therefore should stand the test of time, and when it comes to weddings, timeless is key.

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Image via Crossed Keys
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Image via The French Tangerine

But Blue in nature, doesn’t tend to be an easy task…..Blue, from soft powdery baby blues to strong navy blue in fabrics, no worries, but as soon as a client wants to ‘match’ that fabric…..well, that opens a whole world of trouble. The difficulty with blue when working with flowers is that very few flowers exist in straight clean colour tones, making it near impossible to ‘match’ them. As a florist, I do not see this as a major issue as it is not essential to match every element, but rather use complementary colour tones to create a harmonious colour palette. Some blue blooms are more silvery or dusty, with an almost grey over tone,  others tend to look more purple in some lights. There are several blooms available in more powdery baby blue tones, so if you do prefer to match colours, then this may be the best choice for you!

In order to incorporate true primary blue tones you may need to look beyond flowers. Think about ways you can add your chosen feature colour in unique touches throughout your day. Why not use coloured glassware on your tables, or bottles as your pew ends, ribbon details on plain dresses, or choose strong primary blue bridesmaids gowns.

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Image via Wedding Colors
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Image via Wedding Colors
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Image via Intimate weddings

If you favour softer, more powdery baby blues you can sprinkle touches of this colour thoughout most elements as it is not as strong or contrasting as a primary blue. Gorgeous flowergirl outfits can incorporate baby blues easily, soft blue semi precious stones in jewellry, soft blue toned flowers are easier to come by, men’s ties or handkerchief details, even powder blue suits, cake icing, or check out these gorgeous doors that you could hire as your ceremony backdrop!

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Image via Hello May
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Image ; Fab Tutus
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Image via Deer Pearl Flowers

Navy blue is the most conservative of all the blue hues. It is a strong, sleek tone that can easily be incorporated into bridal party outfits, with navy suits, bridesmaids gowns and navy detailing on flowergirls dresses.

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Image: Valient Wang
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Image: Princessly

I love the way this cake utilises some softer blue flowers on top, and then used blueberries at the base. Pieces of navy lace can feature on invitations, bouquet handles, and even as a trim on the cake.

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By no means am I trying to deter any beautiful brides-to-be from using blue, but rather trying to show alternative ways the colour can be used throughout your day with some gorgeous results!

Can we give you a helping hand with any other colours you may be considering using for your upcoming wedding? Drop us a line and let us inspire you!

Fwf x

 

 

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