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Scarcity of Quality Florists

Ever thought about being a florist?

If the conversations I used to have in the shop daily are anything to go by, almost every second person has thought about becoming a florist at some point in their lives….that, or they know someone who ‘used to be’ a florist.

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Source: Kochie’s Business Builders

For a profession that seems so pleasant, at least from the outside, believe it or not it is becoming increasingly hard to find suitably qualified and experienced staff.

This isn’t an entirely new problem, floristry has always attracted a younger crowd, some, new school leavers who work whilst studying for their ‘real career’. But the trend has been and continues to be that the industry burns and churns through staff, working them hard and failing to offer something worth staying for. Finding qualified, experienced, seasoned professionals is hard.

There are so many things about working within the industry that are attractive. For a creative soul, you get to create new designs and arrangements everyday and keep yourself constantly challenged artistically. That in itself is a pretty incredible opportunity for anyone who wants to make a living out of making and creating.

Working with nature is also said to have countless health benefits in terms of lowering stress levels and anxiety.

There are jobs within the industry that can be relatively stress free too, which can be appealing, and there are of course opportunities to specialise in weddings, funerals and events, which do include some level of stress and pressure.

Hands of florist making a beautiful bouquet
source: Bloom College

Physically, the job is not easy on your body, with long hours spent standing on your feet. And I dare you to ask a florist to show your their hands up close….coz they are not pretty, and we can be pretty self conscious about them.

But the biggest problem I believe with the industry attracting and retaining quality candidates is the fact that even after you have undertaken your training and received your qualification, you can only expect to be paid as a retail shop assistant. That’s the same wage you can expect as a sales assistant in a clothing shop or a corner store….yet you had to train for a minimum of 2 years.

The problem with that is that with no experience, a newly qualified florist can expect the same wage as a highly experienced florist. And by no means am I suggesting that the newly qualified florist isn’t entitled to this minimal wage, but instead, what is required is a clear grading system based on responsibilities and experience.

If that isn’t the case, what is there in place to retain staff?

That is why I believe we also see such a huge age divide in the industry. The older florists who continue to work in the industry have been working as a florist for such a long time, they perhaps lack the transferable skills or confidence to try something new. The newly qualified florists make up for their lack of experience with their confidence, however sometimes seem unwilling to ‘start from the bottom’. We are then left with a massive gap right in the middle; where the staff with enough experience and innovation would slot in. They would have adequate knowledge, but be flexible and open to new ideas.

🤔

I don’t think the grass is always greener, as I have tried other careers and don’t feel half the satisfaction I do when working with flowers…BUT I feel like we have lots of room for improvement in the industry.

What was the best thing about your job or industry?

Fwf x

 

 

 

 

 

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Spring Wedding Checklist

Most people I know are counting down the final month of Winter. It seems that after an incredibly looong Summer, we skipped Autumn altogether and had an extra long and extra cold Winter.

Spring is one of the prettiest times of the year. The gardens are in bloom, fruit trees are beginning to sprout, trees are showing all the signs of fresh growth with light green tips at their tops.

Spring also marks one of the busiest periods for weddings as the temperatures are more moderate, there is less rain and of course, there is an abundance of gorgeous flowers.

Like anything popular, if you fancy booking your wedding during peak season, you need to get in early.

Saturday is still the most popular day for weddings, with some venues offering more competitive pricing for Friday and Sunday events.

Have you considered having a Friday wedding and in turn giving your friends and family a long weekend?

Things to think about before conceptualising your wedding flowers:

  • have you set your venue and the date
  • what coloured elements have you finalised
  • do any of the pieces you have bought/hired/chosen have a clear style or period elements that will dictate the overall aesthetic
  • what kind of textures are present
  • do you prefer a complementary or contrasting colour palette
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Source: Etsy
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Source: Hey Wedding Lady
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Source: Wedding Topia

Venues in peak wedding season (September to March) are often booked approximately 12 months in advance. When you start planning a wedding approximately 12 months in advance, it gives you the opportunity to pay close attention to the temperature, and the surroundings at your venue. Are the grounds lush and green? Are there any large trees that will provide a fabulous backdrop for photos? Are they dramatic and moody as the branches are bare? Or are they pretty and in bloom?

Take the opportunity to look at what is available in the florist shop at the time of year. It is perhaps a little early to make a final decision on what flowers you want a whole year out, however being able to see what is seasonally available and start noticing what you are attracted to is invaluable.

Spring blooms include scented garden roses, stunning lilac, sweetly scented Daphne, Lily of the Valley, Peonies, roses, lisianthus, rhododendron, Calla lilies, Ranunculus, Queen Anne’s Lace, Iris, Tuberose.

I know I have said it before, but by choosing flowers that are naturally available at the time of year that you get married, you are able to transport yourself back in time every time you see or smell them.

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Source: Josie England
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Source: Anna Delores Photography via Style Me Pretty
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Source: Cavenders

Your colour scheme is going to dictate what flowers will or will not work from you. The basis of your colour scheme will be the gowns you choose for yourself (bride) and your bridesmaids. The bridesmaids gowns and the accessories you choose for the gentlemen often has more weight than the bridal gown as they are often fairly neutral in colour.

Once you have purchased your bridal gown and bridesmaids dresses, it is much clearer what styling will tie it all together and what colours will complement.

While trying to work out what kind of look you are attracted to, Pinterest is a fabulous search engine. You can create a variety of mood boards that you can come back to and reconsider as your vision becomes clearer.

Wedding colour consultations are in depth, personalised meetings, and for that reason you want to make sure you make the most of your time. Being clear on the aesthetic you want to create allows your florist to recommend different ways to achieve that.

Fwf x

Feature Image: Everence Photography

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